HIGH-TECH TAILORING

April 16, 2003 12:00 am
ON THE CUTTING EDGE: Linda Frobig uses laser lights, beamed from 12 camera heads, that produce a 360-degree body scan from which the person being scanned can have sewing patterns made. (Observer photos/RAY LINKER).
ON THE CUTTING EDGE: Linda Frobig uses laser lights, beamed from 12 camera heads, that produce a 360-degree body scan from which the person being scanned can have sewing patterns made. (Observer photos/RAY LINKER).

By Ray Linker

Observer Staff Writer

Some talented women have given up sewing their own clothes because the patterns they buy didn't match up to the way their body is shaped and they didn't look good in the clothes they made.

That can all change with new technology, which was on display for four days in La Grande last week.

Linda Frobig of Viking Distributing Co. brought the latest technology to town in a specially built truck and set it up in front of Claudson's Viking and Hot Springs Spa Center on Adams Avenue.

Inside was a high-tech device that — using laser lights beamed from 12 camera heads — in 60 seconds does a 360-degree body scan from which the person being scanned can have patterns made that will produce clothes that really fit, Frobig said. The device goes by the name "the body/skanner ™."

"We burn the scan onto a CD and then we can produce patterns that give a true personal fit. This breaks all the standards of sizes. It will allow tailoring of clothes that fit the person's body," she said.

"We think this will revolutionize the sewing industry."

The customer gets 46 measurements from Unique Pattern Co., which lets them access 600 patterns in color, including going into a library of embroidery design. They do this by accessing the Web site: thevirtualyou.com

The scan, which costs $99, also comes with a subscription to a quarterly newsletter and a lifetime membership to Unique, so that if a person's weight fluctuates, they can go online and update their measurements, Linda said.

Frobig started out in February visiting seven states and is booked into October, she said.

She was in La Grande at the store owned by Sandi and Greg Gross, from Wednesday through Saturday.