ONE POINT GUARD PASSES THE TORCH TO ANOTHER

January 19, 2004 11:00 pm
RECORD SETTER: Eastern's Tricia Haddock had the school's career assists mark after Saturday's game against Oregon Tech. She broke the old record set a decade ago by her coach Anji Weissenfluh. (The Observer/PIERRE LaBOSSIERE).
RECORD SETTER: Eastern's Tricia Haddock had the school's career assists mark after Saturday's game against Oregon Tech. She broke the old record set a decade ago by her coach Anji Weissenfluh. (The Observer/PIERRE LaBOSSIERE).

Eastern Oregon coach Anji Weissenfluh didn't mind one bit seeing one of her collegiate records broken.

Her starting point guard Tricia Haddock vaulted right past her record Saturday night.

Haddock has 431 career assists, passing Weissenfluh's 427. Weissenfluh played for Eastern from 1989-93.

Haddock didn't back into this record either. She broke it in a big hurry, racking up nine assists Friday against Southern Oregon, then adding 10 Saturday against Oregon Tech, raising her already league-leading 5.9 assists per game to 6.4 in the process.

She is averaging nearly two assists per game more than any other player in the Cascade Collegiate Conference.

At this rate, Haddock, a Parma, Idaho, product, will easily break her season record for assists of 143 (5.7 per game), which she set in 2002-03. With at least 10 more games left this season, she's also going to build a huge gap between her record and Weissenfluh's career mark.

"Oh, it meant a lot (to break the record). Finally, in my basketball career, I got over that peak. It was nice to have the coach rooting me on all year long," said Haddock.

In addition to all those assists, Haddock has shown her leadership with clutch 3-pointers in the final minutes of close games.

Weissenfluh, who has a 55-36 record as coach for EOU, said she literally has nightmares about what she is going to do next year without Haddock. She said Haddock has been doing the job at the point for four solid years.

"I couldn't ask for a better point guard. I can't think of a better athlete (to break my record)," Weissenfluh said.