Viewing Report for November 16, 2012

By Observer Upload November 16, 2012 12:48 pm
A cedar waxwing takes in the view while preparing to devour some mountain ash berries. Waxwings are flocking up at this time and seeking out fruit. Favorites might include the smallest crabapples, hawthorne, Peking cotoneaster and highbush cranberries. Later in the season, the larger Bohemian waxwings will migrate from the north and begin foraging in local backyards. JIM WARD photo
A cedar waxwing takes in the view while preparing to devour some mountain ash berries. Waxwings are flocking up at this time and seeking out fruit. Favorites might include the smallest crabapples, hawthorne, Peking cotoneaster and highbush cranberries. Later in the season, the larger Bohemian waxwings will migrate from the north and begin foraging in local backyards. JIM WARD photo

UNION COUNTY

Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area

Note: Wildlife viewers and anglers need a parking permit to park on the wildlife area. The $7 daily or $22 annual permit can be purchased online or at an ODFW office that sells licenses or at a license sales agent. Learn more about ODFW’s expanded Wildlife Area Parking Permit Program.

Tule Lake Public Access Area and the Auto Route are closed for the season. Tule Lake Public Access Area will be open to foot traffic only Saturday, Sunday, Wednesday and holidays during the pheasant and waterfowl seasons. The Glass Hill Unit is open to public access for foot traffic only. Visitors are advised to carefully read posted
signs and consult game bird regulations before entering the wildlife 
area. Dogs are not permitted within the Wildlife Area, on or off leash except during authorized hunting seasons. There are numerous quality-viewing opportunities from county roads that pass through the area. Binoculars or a spotting scope will help as many animals are best viewed from a distance.

Tundra swans can be seen in the refuge below Foothill Road and in scattered ponds around the wildlife area.  

A variety of smaller waterfowl are also in the area including mallard, green-winged teal, gadwall, northern shoveler, ring-necked duck, lesser scaup and Canada goose. A few canvasbacks have been spotted in the area recently.

Winter residents such as spotted towhee, dark-eyed junco, white-crowned sparrow and northern shrike have arrived and may be seen in a variety of locations within the wildlife area. American tree sparrows have been found in tree and shrub rows. Also, both mountain chickadees and Steller’s jays have been unusually widespread in the valley this fall including the wildlife area.

For more information on access rules for Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, consult the Oregon Game Bird Regulations or call the wildlife area at 541-963-4954.