A unique ride for freedom

By Dick Mason, The Observer April 09, 2014 10:53 am

Sam Hopkins-Hubbard speaks to members of Union Elementary School’s third-grade class on Tuesday. Hopkins-Hubbard is in the early stages of a horseback ride across the United States, where he is sharing a message about patriotism and love of country. (PHIL BULLOCK/The Observer)
Sam Hopkins-Hubbard speaks to members of Union Elementary School’s third-grade class on Tuesday. Hopkins-Hubbard is in the early stages of a horseback ride across the United States, where he is sharing a message about patriotism and love of country. (PHIL BULLOCK/The Observer)

A 3,000-mile itinerary, two horses and one message. Sam Hopkins-Hubbard of Milton-Freewater entered Union with all three Tuesday to the delight of many Union School District students.  

Hopkins-Hubbard is in the early stages of a horseback ride across the United States, a ride where he is sharing a message about patriotism and love of country. He stopped in Union to speak with Union elementary and high school students about his trip and his message. His talks, made outdoors with his horses, ran long because of the many questions students asked him.  

Hopkins-Hubbard started his ride on Saturday and hopes to conclude it on the coast of Virginia by Sept. 1. The opportunity to cross the United States on horseback is something he could not pass up in part because of his love of horses.

“I like being a cowboy. I wanted to go across the country as a cowboy,’’ said Hopkins-Hubbard, who has titled his cross country trek One Nation Ride. 

He is making the ride with two horses, one to carry supplies and one to ride. He alternates which horse he rides. 

Hopkins-Hubbard is difficult to miss regardless of where he is because of the large American flag he is carrying throughout his ride.

The flag is a symbol of the message he is conveying, one focusing on what must be done to preserve the freedoms the founders of the United States gave all of its citizens.

“It we stand united we will keep what our forefathers gave us,’’ Hopkins-Hubbard said. “I love the freedom our forefathers gave us.”

The rider said that we risk losing these freedoms when we let the role of government expand.

“Every time we ask government to do something which is our responsibility, we give a portion of our freedom away,” Hopkins-Hubbard said.